Call for proposals! Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (An Edited Collection)

Working title:
Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (An Edited Collection)

Shana Higgins and Lua Gregory are instruction and reference librarians at the University of Redlands.

In her award winning essay “Information Literacy and Reflective Pedagogical Praxis,” Heidi L.M. Jacobs draws out the inherent democratizing and social justice elements of information literacy as defined in the “Alexandria Proclamation On Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning.” She suggests that because of these underlying social justice elements, information literacy “is not only educational but also inherently political, cultural, and social” (258). We propose to extend the discussion of information literacy and its social justice aspects that James Elmborg, Cushla Kapitzke, Maria T. Accardi, Emily Drabinski, and Alana Kumbier, and Maura Smale have begun.



Here are some statistics to get you started as far as women's numbers in publishing with Pulitzer Prize statistics (not yet looking specifically at gender/race, gender/parent-status, gender/socioeconomics):

Baggott, J. (2009, December 30). The key to literary success? Be a man -- or
write like one. The Washington Post. Retrieved from :

I could understand Publishers Weekly's phallocratic list if women were writing only a third of the books published or if women didn't float the industry as book buyers or if the list were an anomaly. In fact, Publishers Weekly is in sync with Pulitzer Prize statistics. In the past 30 years, only 11 prizes have gone to women. Amazon recently announced its 100 best books of 2009 -- in the top 10, there are two women. Top 20? Four. Poets & Writers shared a list of 50 of the most inspiring writers in the world this month; women made up only 36 percent.

Fact Monster from Information Please gives lists of who has won:
Letters, drama, & music

Perugia Press has broken the listings down into percentages:

* Pulitzer Prize for Poetry: 68% male winners, 32% female winners
* Nobel Prize in Literature: 87% male winners, 13% female winners
* National Book Critics Circle Award: 62% male winners, 38% female winners
* PEN/Faulkner Award: 86% male winners, 14% female winners
* Booker Prize: 69% male winners, 31% female winners

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