Rad Ref @ Occupy Wall Street

The NYC Radical Reference collective will be meeting at the People's Library at Zuccotti Park Friday, October 7th at 6pm in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement. We'll be doing street reference, and helping the library and the people as are able.

Join us!

Please bring plastic tubs for the library and sleeping bags, blankets, warm clothes and love for the folks of Occupy Wall Street.

QUESTION: Literature

question / pregunta: 

Hi! I want to attempt to read some fiction to better understand the radical ideas that have been expressed in American Literature as well as to hear from some underrepresented voices. I want to be cautious about giving my time to authors that reinforce values of patriarchy, sexism, racism, or republic of America values.

I want to point you to an example of what didn’t work for me. I just finished reading the Adventurous of Tom Sawyer, and I felt Mark Twain might have been too apologetic for my taste and too nostalgic about a time period when slavery existed. I don’t want to waste my time on these kinds of books. I’m looking for books that have a stronger voice, reflection, or opinion when it comes to anti-racism or anti-patriarchy.

Are there any web sites or resources that point out “radical fiction” titles that would be good for me to read? I know there has got to be a syllabus for a class out there or a review publication or web site that would serve as a starting point for me to pick out my books. Thanks in advance for your help!

People's Library of Occupy Wall Street seeks help

"Greetings from the librarians of #occupywallstreet!

We write today to invite you to help build the People’s Library. We are working together to build a library for both the people of the city and for those who have joined the occupation. We are a mixed bunch of librarians and library-loving individuals who strongly support the #occupy movement and who also know that information is liberation. We liberate through knowledge. If you want to know more about #occupywallstreet and the #occupy movement please read the Principles of Solidarity and read the blog.

Right now need many different kinds of donations. We need books of resistance and people’s history. We need economics and finance books. We need contemporary philosophy and ecology. We especially need non-English books and materials for low literacy readers.

QUESTION: book stores

question / pregunta: 

I am an activist visiting NY in October. Have little time in NYC but would like to check out a (used) bookstore or two. Interested in philosophy, education, postcolonialism, Palestine and/or Edward Said, writers like Joseph Massad, Robert Jensen, Noam Chomsky, Sut Jhally, topics like (Jewish) anti-Zionism and generally speaking left wing, progressive ideas. Can you give me a name or two of (used) bookstores for someone with my interests?

QUESTION: Citations for research articles on hydraulic fracturing/hydrofracking for natural gas?

question / pregunta: 

Can you help me collect citations/abstracts/full-text of research articles related to hydrofracking for natural gas? I'm particularly looking for technical/engineering and toxicology articles investigating the potential/actual harms caused by the hydraulic fracturing process. Articles concerning the socioeconomic impacts are useful as well. The more reputable and mainstream the journal, the better, since our goal is to provide comments to the Department of Environmental Conservation.

Abstracts and citations are appreciated, as I can probably track down the full text. Search strategy suggestions are also welcome.

For the sake of disclosure, I'm an occasional RR volunteer but I could use support and assistance from other activist library folks on this task. I'm working with citizens' groups in upstate NY to provide substantial comments on the Draft SGEIS, which will determine the constraints placed on fracking permits across NY, and influence the final regulations governing the process in our state.

If this question doesn't meet the guidelines, please let me know and I'm happy to take it down.

Thank you for your help!

Call for proposals! Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (An Edited Collection)

Working title:
Information Literacy and Social Justice: Radical Professional Praxis (An Edited Collection)

Editors:
Shana Higgins and Lua Gregory are instruction and reference librarians at the University of Redlands.

Outline:
In her award winning essay “Information Literacy and Reflective Pedagogical Praxis,” Heidi L.M. Jacobs draws out the inherent democratizing and social justice elements of information literacy as defined in the “Alexandria Proclamation On Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning.” She suggests that because of these underlying social justice elements, information literacy “is not only educational but also inherently political, cultural, and social” (258). We propose to extend the discussion of information literacy and its social justice aspects that James Elmborg, Cushla Kapitzke, Maria T. Accardi, Emily Drabinski, and Alana Kumbier, and Maura Smale have begun.

QUESTION: Correctional Service of Canada Grievance Process

question / pregunta: 

Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) has an internal grievance procedure in which prisoners can try and resolve problems that arise within the system (eg. not getting proper health care, not getting access to family visits, being unfairly charged with an institutional offence etc). There are 3 levels to the greivance process (1st which is at the institutional level, 2nd which is at the regional level, and 3rd level which is technically the last level). After a prisoner has exhausted the third level grievance they can take their grievance to federal court. The grievance system was put in place to ensure prisoners were able to get access to a timely and fair process to their complaints. Unfortunately, this system has been an on-going failure and has not met the needs of prisoners. Several inquiries have been conducted to talk about the failures of the penal system and several of these public inquiries have criticized the grievance system (Arbour Report, several Correctional Investigator Reports and maybe others). Most of these public inquiries, investigations, inquests etc have stated that the grievance system should be an EXTERNAL process instead of the system investigating themselves (much like complaints of the police investigating the police). I have spoken to a few prisoners and we would like to create a research document outlining the critiques of the grievance system and recommendations to resolve this problem. I am wondering if you would be able to look into any sources that critique the Canadian Federal greivance system? I would like to create a background document with references to suggest why we need an external process. This could be a very effective advocacy tool to bring legislation forward to protect the rights of prisoners and their loved ones.

QUESTION: How do I find a non-profits IRS 900 form when Guidestar won't turn anything up?

question / pregunta: 

I'm looking into a non-profit called the Alliance for Youth Movements (movements.org). I searched for its IRS 990 forms on both guidestar.org and foundationcenter.org and nothing turned up. How do I get their 990? Do I have to go through the IRS directly? Is it possible for non-profits to file their IRS paperwork under a different name than the one they publicly use, making it impossible to search for their records?

QUESTION: grant opportunities for not-for-profits (organizations that are not 501C3 registered "non-profits")

question / pregunta: 

Is there a radical reference section on grants or general fundraising opportunities for not-for-profit organizations? I've been trying to find grant opportunities for our collective, but we are not a 501C3 (registered non-profit) and don't plan on becoming one. We are a collective space that has a tool cooperative, infoshop, free store, community garden, and organizing space for groups such as food-not-bombs and free school.

Tracking Hurricane Irene - some useful links and maps

James Jacobs over at Free Government Information just posted on this.
And this only-useful-if-you-live-in-New-York-City-map is pretty informative.
Also, this nice list of mobile apps and such-
And, listen to live online stream 24x7 from first responders + FEMA Daily Updates HERE

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